RSS

Category Archives: Gaming

Role playing and tabletop games

Survival in Stonehell

It’s been a busy week, so I’ve been neglecting the Belfry, but I wanted to pop in and leave a game update.

When last we left our intrepid adventurers, they were lost on the 2nd level of Stonehell, somewhere in the Reptile House. They managed to rest up and regain spells, then deliberated on what to do next.

They decided to try and make their way back up the slide, determining that it would be safer to brave the climb than the unknown dangers, and hoping that the zombies were not still waiting above the pit. So they sent the thief on up, armed with determination and a lot of rope.

As luck would have it the zombies had indeed returned to their crypt, but while hauling people up they did have an encounter. A kobold work crew, moving as silently as possible, came in to check on the pit. The party has learned enough about how Stonehell works to understand the kobold’s role, did nothing threatening. Looking at the tools the kobolds were carrying, they realized that the work crew was there to reset the pit trap. But because the party did nothing hostile they were happy to wait while the adventures pulled the rest of their friends up. The cleric of Set, who speaks kobold, was even able to share a (quiet) laugh at their predicament. They asked for the shortest directions to reach Kobold Corners, and the work crew obliged, giving them instructions that would bring them to the back door.

The kobolds neglected to mention the locked gate. Not for any nefarious reasons, mind you. It just didn’t occur to them to mention it. The party thanked them and moved off down the quiet corridors, leaving the kobolds to their work.

Their next surprise came when zombies in hidden crypts began breaking through the walls on either side of them. The team made a run for it, looking over their shoulders long enough to see a dozen or more zombies stumbling into the corridor. What followed was a wonderful chase through darkened halls; doors were barricaded and beaten down, wrong turns were taken, pitfalls were overcome, and they had an encounter with a mysterious madman who they believe to be a necromancer.

The finale of the chase had part of the party throwing all their weight against an unlockable door with the entire horde pushing on it, while the thief and elf frantically worked on the locked gate. They popped the lock, jumped through the gate, and slammed it just as the zombie horde burst through.

It was glorious.

After that they had an audience with the head kobold, Trustee Sniv, and made a generous contribution to his coffers to compensate for the disturbance. After that Elf the elf made his booze delivery to the bar, followed by a few drinks, and then they retired to the inn to get some rest. Several of the characters were seriously injured and the chance of sanctuary was very welcome.

The party has several choices to make in the next game. The thief, blinded by the Wheel of Fortune in their previous delve, now wears an enchanted scarf over her eyes that gives her sight. It was given to her by a masked sorceress known as The Veiled Lady, who has tasked her to find a lost magician’s laboratory, hidden somewhere near Kobold Corners. It seems likely that they will begin their search for it in the next session, but I’ve learned not to take anything for granted with my party.

Ossuary_(909213294)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 26, 2016 in Fantasy, Gaming

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Fleet is In

My new space armada has arrived!

I picked up a set of plastic space ship miniatures on a recent Amazon order. I’ve been looking for a decent and cheap source for ships to use in various games and this pack looked like just the ticket. You can find them here.

SShips3

 

These plastic ships come in a pack of 144 for under $7.00 and use a variety of molds. Their quality is fine, they won’t blow you away but they are not bad at all, and the quantity you get for the price is impressive.

Some of the molds look familiar to me, while others I’ve never seen. And then there is this one, that hit my nostalgia buttons very hard:

SShips2

Way back in the early 80’s I was a brand new gamer. I had just gotten my first copy of TSR’s Star Frontiers and falling in love with sci-fi gaming. I was getting into miniatures and had a few boxes of fantasy figures, but was having trouble finding sci-fi sets.

Then one day I was in the toy section of a department store and there on the shelf was a set of Traveller 15mm lead figures. The set had various space adventurers and this air car, complete with a removable figure. I snatched it up. (Lead gaming figures in a department store toy aisle, rare in the 80’s but impossible to imagine today).

I never found any more figures for Traveller, nor for that matter did I find the game itself. The only store in town with gaming stuff didn’t carry it and I did not yet really get ordering by mail, but I played with those figures for years.

I’m pleased with my purchase and finding this blast from the past is icing on the cake. I don’t have any specific plans for them, but sooner or later I’ll unleash them on my tabletop.

SShips1

 
 

Tags: , , , ,

Gaming!

This past weekend I got together with friends for some board/card gaming, with the specific goal of getting some titles to the table that we haven’t tried yet.

It was an excellent day filled with good times. We had a five-player game of our perennial favorite, High Noon Saloon, and played several titles that were new to me such as Aye, Dark Overlord and We Didn’t Play Test This at All. However there were two games that stood out in particular, for very different reasons.

The first was Galactic Strike Force by Greater Than Games. I’m a sucker for spaceship games and I adore their other masterpiece, Sentinels of the Multiverse, so I was more than eager to give it a try.

The result?

Well…

Okay, there’s a game in there somewhere. We found it. We put a lot of effort into finding it, but I can’t say if I like it or not. I think it’s fun?

Way back in the day, my friend brought over the original release of Sentinels of the Multiverse and we gave it a try. That first publishing taught us two things; Greater than Games can produce amazing products, but they also write rule books of questionable clarity. It took a little effort, but we figured it out and have been Sentinels fans ever since.

The rules of Galactic Strike Force are more fiddly and it took four of us, all experienced gamers, constantly referencing the manual and the online FAQ before we finally got into the groove and made the game work. After all that, I’m not sure if I like it or not. I want to give it another shot now that we have a handle on it, with different characters and a different opponent, to see how it shakes down.

On the other end of the spectrum, we played my new copy of Tail Feathers by Plaid Hat Games. This is the aerial combat game set in the universe of Mice and Mystics, and it is a fantastic game.

Right off the bat, the figures are spectacular. There are several detailed armored birds on tilting flight bases. You have rider miniatures you can put on the birds and a number of ground figures. The quality of game pieces has skyrocketed across the board and even given that high bar the figures in Tail Feathers stand out.

This game also nails the theme to an amazing degree. The board, the rules, the pieces, all contribute to feeling like you’re involved in a battle between noble mouse knights and dastardly rat brigands. Even the range finder contributes; it’s designed to look like a stick with a leather wrapped handle. The stick defines the range for missile weapons, while anything within the range of the leather wrapping is at melee range.

The rules are clever, innovative, and laid out in a clear fashion. I read through them twice and was familiar enough to get us going. From there it wasn’t hard to know where to find specifics as needed. We jumped past the basic game and used several of the advanced mechanics right away. I feel confident that in our next game we’ll toss in all the rest.

I can’t say enough good things about Tail Feathers. My only mild criticism is that for the moment it’s a two player game. I believe that a four-way war would be both manageable and epic, if we had the factions to carry it out (two sets of the core game would certainly work). However from all reports there will be expansions to expand the number of factions and how many people can play.

I don’t want to give the wrong idea; often when you talk about a game needing expansions it’s because the core game doesn’t feel done. That’s not the case in Tail Feathers. You get a lot of game in the core box, plenty to keep you entertained. In addition, if you already own Mice and Mystics (which I do not), you can use those characters in Tail Feathers.

Finally, let me tell you a tail of heroes. In our game there were two standout figures, two amazing rodents who rose to become legends. The first was Super-Rat, a no-named minion who could not be stopped. He survived drifting from one tree to another on a leaf and survived after all his companions had fallen. Hero mouse knights on their bird mounts could not stop him. An entire unit of mouse archers could not stop him. Without mercy or hesitation he laid siege to the mouse nest and gave victory to the rat invaders.

His counterpart was Super-Mouse, who was also a no-named woodland warrior. He crept across the meadow to attack the rat’s nest. He faced a rat champion in single combat and bested him. He single-pawedly almost turned the tide of battle and came within a whisker of saving the game, rolling maximum damage with his bow several times in a row. In the end it was not enough and the mice still faced defeat, but the legend of these two valiant vermin will forever resound in our gaming halls.

TailFeathersMed

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 9, 2016 in Gaming

 

Tags: , , , ,

An Ever Changing Land

I’ve noticed a pattern that shows up a lot in folk tales, legends, and other stories in that style; a hero goes wandering not far from home and stumbles across a mysterious castle, manor, or some other mysterious structure. The location invariably becomes the source of adventure, often as home to some unearthly being or powerful wizard.

What strikes me as odd about this is that castles and fortresses are important landmarks. They confer control of an area, provide wealth to their masters, and are significant to life in the region.

In the case of the peasant-hero, the mysterious castle is understandable. It’s easy to explain that a peasant hasn’t traveled extensively, especially into woods or mountains where danger and the unknown abound. I am reminded of the scene in Fellowship of the Rings where Samwise takes his first step outside of the Shire.

However it makes less sense when reading about knights and nobles. It would be their business to know the people and strongholds of power that surround their world. It’s hard to believe that there would be a castle within a day’s ride of Camelot that an Arthurian knight wouldn’t know about.

Unless their world operates on different rules than ours does.

A common theme in early Dungeons & Dragons, and the Appendix N literature that inspired it, is the conflict between Law, represented by civilization, and Chaos, represented by the wilderness. Settlements are sanctuaries from the unpredictable and unearthly. Perhaps not safe, but their dangers are mundane and rational. Incursions of chaos into a city, through monsters or witchcraft, are treated as abnormal and cause fear in a different way that simple crime or political intrigue.

The wilderness is unpredictable, it shifts and changes when you aren’t looking. Paths in the woods lead to different places in the darkness. Forgotten groves may be both ancient and new at the same time. Those who ally themselves with Chaos may find that they can raise a castle from the darkness, to serve as a base of power or snare for a knight errant.

Through this lens the world becomes a shifting and unpredictable place. Castles, caverns, even entire dungeons may spawn in the dark places of their own accord, or by the will of powerful beasts, cunning Faeries, or sinister wizards. Rarely traveled paths may never lead to the same place twice and abandoned places may vanish entirely as memory of their existence fades.

In contrast, settlements impose order on the world. As they grow they become islands of stability, and well traveled roads become the framework on which Law fences off and restricts the spread of Chaos.

In this world brigands become the unwitting agents of Chaos, for when people fear to use the roads, the realms of Law become disconnected. Road wardens and Templars become paladins of Law, and settlers are the very seeds of Law who must be protected and nurtured.

Even the traditional “Murder Hobo” adventurers would be the unwitting minions of order, for as they plunder the wealth of dungeons and slaughter monsters in the dark places they open up new realms for settlement. No matter what alignment these adventurers claim, they serve the greater cause of Law by blazing trails into the heart of Chaos and opening the way for others to follow.

It would be fun to run a campaign that mixes the multi-generational feudal setting of Pendragon with the macabre sensibilities of Solomon Kane, where the true nature of the world is kept hidden from the players. Over time the characters and their decedents would discover the truth of the world, and how seemingly mundane events are vastly important on the cosmic scale. It would be fun to see how a group of characters would react, especially as they realize that those who know the truth can influence the universe.

Would they form knightly orders to spread Law? Form dark cabals to unfetter Chaos? Or create secret societies to hide the knowledge that reality is a malleable thing?

And my gaming bucket list grows ever deeper.

KingArthur

 
5 Comments

Posted by on February 3, 2016 in Fantasy, Gaming, World Design

 

Tags: , ,

Return to Stonehell

With the holidays behind us my gaming group decided to get back to some serious dungeon delving, so it was back to Stonehell!

This is the third expedition into the dungeon for my players. Their previous trips were before Christmas and they went very well, included some delightfully harrowing encounters, and were chronicled in a previous blog post that was eaten when I went to save it. Suffice to say that they have explored most of Hell’s Antechamber.

The party has a new member, my ten year old daughter who was very excited to play Dungeons & Dragons / Labyrinth Lord. We got out the dice and rolled her up a character, a magic user with horrible stats for constitution and charisma but excellent wisdom and intelligence. We determined that she’s a frail, foul tempered witch type, a role my daughter was disturbingly eager to play. Especially when she found out that she could be evil. Petunia the Witch and the cleric of Set are getting along famously.

It’s fun to see how players’ actions can change a DM’s plans. I have a table of events that could happen for each session. I roll once per session to see which of them, if any, will come up, but actions by the players made me decide to have several show up at once.

First there is the thief who was blinded by the Wheel of Fortune on their last foray. One of the encounters I had planned was for a sorceress to contract with the party to find a certain location within Stonehell, bring her the information, and first pick of anything discovered within. This would only come up after the party had survived a couple of sorties into Stonehell, as she would only treat with adventurers with a proven record. The sorceress provided the thief with a silk scarf that allows her hazy vision when worn over her eyes like a blindfold. The thief agreed to the sorceress’ deal, without discussing it with the rest of the party, and the sorceress’ halfling aide will be remaining in the village to receive reports on their progress.

The sorceress is known as the Veiled Lady and is covered head-to-toe in elaborate Byzantine robes and wears a mask of beaten gold. The party knows nothing more about her, though they can guess she comes from Fever Dreaming Marlinko. I’ll be interested in seeing how her relationship grows with the party. Assuming they survive.

Then the elf, named “Elf”, decided that he wants to learn the kobold language. He began asking around the village. This triggered another encounter I had on the list. A merchant is trying to get several pony kegs of liqueur to Kobold Corners, somewhere on the first level of Stonehell, but his hired guards never arrived. He agreed to teach Elf how to speak kobold if Elf would transport them and come back with a receipt from Yik-Yik, his kobold client. The party was already planning on heading there and has a line on its location, so Elf agreed. He purchased two dogs to serve as pack animals and a puppy for the blind thief, suggesting that they could raise it to be a seeing eye dog.

The thief was not amused, but she does like the puppy.

After that it was back to Stonehell. Outside the gatehouse they met the encounter that I’d actually rolled for this session, a group of armed guards with caged carts, camped casually outside the ruined gatehouse. They greeted the party and began making wagers on if they’d see the adventurers again.

It turns out that the nobles of Marlinko will buy slaves and convicts and send them into Stonehell. If they survive and bring back sufficient treasure they can win their freedom, but really it’s so that the nobles can bet on how long they’ll survive. The guards told the adventurers that the nobles use scrying devices to watch their hapless slaves inside the dungeon. The adventurers were told that if they encountered the slaves inside it would be fine to kill them, but to make it look good.

Returning to the dungeon’s depths they first stopped off to chat with “Rocky” the stone oracle. Then they were off to find Kobold Corners. On their previous expedition they’d had a bad encounter with the orcs, so they decided to cut through the undead-filled Quiet Halls.

Along the way they were ambushed by a number of skeletons, who gave the adventurers a good beating before finally being dispatched. While the party was recovering and taking stock, Elf located and opened a secret door. Peering inside he saw a crypt, and rising from the burial niches were zombies. Lots of zombies.

Elf slammed the door, ran past the party yelling, “Time to go!” and headed down the south passageway, where he promptly fell into a covered pit trap.

This was no ordinary pit trap, instead he found himself (and his dogs) tumbling down a slide into the next level of the dungeon. The party, seeing the zombies shambling out from the secret door and now blocking them from the room’s other entrance, decided to take their chances following Elf and slipped down the pit to the slide and off into the darkness. Everyone survived, though one of the pack dogs died in the fall.

The party is now in a dangerous situation. They have time to catch their breath, but they’re lost on level two. They’ve debated trying to climb back up the slide, but are not sure how far down they’ve come nor if the zombies are still waiting for them. They’ve explored enough to have discovered the temple of Yg, a primordial serpent god that the cleric of Set knows is older and not agreeable to his own deity.

And that is where we left things. The players realize that they could be in real trouble, but their luck and cunning has seen them through tight spots before. If they play things right they may yet see the light of day once more.

And if not? Well, I have spare character sheets.

Rocky

I found our “Rocky” oracle at Wal-Mart in the fish tank section.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 25, 2016 in Fantasy, Gaming

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Against the Slave Lords

I’m not picking up any more books, physical or digital, until I catch up on my backlog. I have enough books and gaming materials to keep me occupied for a long time.

Wait, what’s this?

*sigh* Okay, ONE more .pdf can’t hurt, right?

DND Classics/DriveThruRPG/RPGNow has a lot of classic Dungeons & Dragons products on sale right now, but one of the most notable is the recently-released .PDF copy of the complete Against the Slave Lords campaign. This is the digital version of the hard cover print collection they released not too long ago. This book includes the classic A1-4 as well as the adventure A0, Danger at Darkshelf Quarry which was added for the hardbound collection. On a quick skim it looks like the .PDF is a good clean scan.

Clocking in at 178 pages the full cost is about $50, but for the time being it’s on sale for $9.99. At that price I had to fail my Saving Throw vs New Books.

You can find Against the Slave Lords right over here.

D20

Clearly I need to add a picture with the “1” showing.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 14, 2016 in Fantasy, Gaming

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Battlestations Version 2.0 is en route!

Back in the belfry’s early days I wrote about my love for the game Battlestations by Gorilla Games.

It’s still one of my favorite games, but it doesn’t hit the table very often anymore, just because it takes more prep and play time than I usually have these days. These days when my group has that kind of time we go for straight up role playing games. Now news has come across the aether that a new edition is on the horizon!

When you have a game as well designed as Battlestations it’s a little nerve wracking to hear about a new edition, especially when you know there will be some noticeable changes to the design. However I am encouraged from some of the news I’ve seen. It looks like the focus has been on streamlining the game, allowing the players to get into the action more quickly but with a focus on keeping the qualities that make Battlestations so much fun.

I will be watching this develop with great interest.

The Kickstarter will be launching on February 2nd!

Below are two videos; the first is an introduction to the game and the second is a simple explanation of the base rules and a play example.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 10, 2016 in Gaming, Science Fiction

 

Tags: , ,

The Collect Call of Cthulhu

Aaaaand, we’re back.

Hope everyone has had a good holiday season. I know I have.

One of the big treats I had was getting my first taste of the new 7th Edition of Call of Cthulhu. I’ve been playing CoC since 3rd Edition and it has been one of the mainstays of every gaming group I’ve been in since high school, so I jumped at the chance to try out the latest incarnation. Due to the production problems at Chaosium the book still isn’t loose in physical form, but our keeper has a .PDF copy. Unfortunately this means I didn’t get to thumb through the rules, so my impressions are based on my one session as a player, but even so I think I have a good handle on where the game has gone.

The Good:

Call of Cthulhu is a tight, easy, excellent rules set and has had few significant changes over the years. New editions made some tweaks, but more often than not consisted of including additional source material and re-organizing the existing rules. With very little effort you can pick up an adventure written for 1st Edition and run it using 6th Edition rules. When I heard that 7th Edition would be making more changes than all the previous editions combined I was concerned.

However, making more changes than all the previous editions combined isn’t a very high bar to cross, and I am happy to say that I quickly fell right into the new system, even without having read the book myself. For an old hand at CoC, looking over the new character sheet is enough to clarify most of the changes and I’m pretty sure that I would be able to convert older edition material on the fly, with only a bit more effort than I could previously. This is the single most important thing I can say about 7th Edition, that it is still backwards compatible.

Changing the basic attributes to percentiles was a good move. It keeps them in line with the derived attributes and codifies the way many players were already doing attribute checks.This combined with opposed roles for tasks has replaced my beloved Resistance Table, but even I must admit that it does streamline the game. Plus the opposed role mechanic is such a staple in modern RPGs that it’s easy for gamers to pick up.

They also trimmed down the skill list on the character sheet, which was a good move. A lot of the entries on the old character sheet just took up space and were rarely used, and in traditional form the new sheet has plenty of blanks to fill in skills not already listed. I don’t know if the trimmed skills are still in the book or not, but pruning the list definitely cleaned things up nicely.

The Bad:

“Bad” is really stretching it. It’s more, “The Not Really Liked”.

The addition of a penalty die to rolls. Under certain circumstances, or if your character decides to try multiple actions, an additional D10 is rolled. This additional die counts as another “tens” die and the penalty means you take the lower of the two rolls for your result. For example, I roll two “tens” dice and get a 7 and a 3, with a 2 on the “ones” dice. My result is 32, using the lower roll. My guess that this mechanic, like the elimination of the Resistance Table, is meant to streamline the game so that you don’t have to look up penalties, but the impression that I had was that it makes the results a lot more swingy. It also makes it harder to determine what chances to take, which is an important consideration in a game like CoC. If you give me a 15% penalty on a roll, then I have a concrete figure to judge if the risk is worth it. But with a penalty die I have a harder time judging. I would love to see some figures on how using a penalty die changes the probabilities for your results, but that’s well beyond my own math skills to figure out.

I get the feeling that the penalty die was meant to offer more choices for the players, but on my initial experience with it I found it confounding.

The Meh:

Instead of being a set attribute, Luck is now a spendable asset pool. You spend them like Magic Points, but to adjust die rolls instead of fueling spells, and like SAN points you can regain them from surviving adventures. This is nothing new in game design and it does give the players an extra edge for survival, but was that necessary for a game like Call of Cthulhu? The place where I do see its value is for investigative skills, for those times you really want to nail the Library Use or Spot Hidden role so you can move an investigation forward. It’s in combat that it rankles my old school CoC heart. I am happy to say that in practice I don’t think it will remove the sharp fear of mortality that CoC players have known and loved over the years, death is still omnipresent, but it does blunt it a bit. That’s why I list this as a “meh” instead of “bad”.

They’ve also added a graduated success result mechanic. CoC has always had a critical success for combat rolls, via the Impalement result for getting under 1/5th of your skill. Making this an across the board critical success for all skills was a no-brainer and codifies what many of us were already doing in play. However they’ve added a Hard Success result for rolls under half your skill. I’m still learning all the implications of this, but it seems unnecessarily fiddly. I don’t see what it adds to the game. Maybe it’ll become more clear once I’ve played more, or once I read the manual, but for now I’m ambivalent at best.

The Summary:

All in all, I had a good experience with the game. There is nothing here that makes me want to run out and get a 7th Edition manual for myself, but I am happy that I’ll be able to sit down at any game of CoC and still know how to play, requiring only a glance at the character sheet to tell me which rules we’re using. I’m happy that I can buy new source books and know that I can use them with my pre-7th Edition rules. I’m happy that if I do switch to 7th Edition I’ll still be able to unleash horrors on my players from my library of older edition books.

Cthulhu1

My 3rd Edition tome, battered like the souls of my players.

 
 

Tags: , , , , ,

Stonehell has Arrived!

My physical copy of Stonehell just arrived in the mail!

I’ve been enjoying the .pdf copy so far, but now I’ve got the physical to add to my collection. Stonehell Dungeon: Into the Heart of Hell now takes its rightful place among my megadungeons.

Megadungeons

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 5, 2015 in Fantasy, Gaming

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Observations about Character Creation

One of the fun things about running Ravenloft again was that I got to revisit AD&D’s character creation rules for the first time in years. From this I learned, or re-learned, quite a few things.

Because the game started with only four players I pre-generated the characters on the high end of the level range for Ravenloft, giving them all 100,000 XP. This put the characters at level seven or eight. As I expected the fighters and clerics were seventh and the thieves were level eight, but I was surprised to see that magic users were also level eight. I’d expected them to also be level seven, but it turns out that the experience curve for magic users shifts after level six. Instead of gaining levels slower than fighters, high level magic users advance noticeably faster.

Multi-classed characters also surprised me. When we first started out, all around 13 years old, we didn’t really get how multi-classing worked. Having different rules for multi-classing spread out over the Players Handbook and the poor quality of the index certainly didn’t help. (In 1st edition the Dungeon Master’s Guide held the index for both the DMG and PHB, and it’s not very comprehensive.) So we rarely created such characters and we were quite happy with single class characters.

In 2015 we have the power of Google to help us. For the first time I can say that I understand how multi-classing and dual-classing works. One of the misconceptions we had was that multi-class characters would fall behind single classed characters, but in creating several of them I found them to be about one level lower than their single class counterparts. I even realized that for 100,000 XP you could create a decent 1st edition Bard, though I decided not to create one of those oddities for this game.

The multi-class rules also gave me some insight into how racial level limits do work out as a game balancer, at least in a game designed for characters to max out in their teens. However I still find them distasteful both from a thematic standpoint and from a game play standpoint. For the fighting classes the rate of advancement should keep the gap from getting too extreme between a level capped demi-human and a human character, and the difference in hit points and tables isn’t so drastic that magic items can’t balance things out. It’s a bigger issue for spellcasters, as many more powerful spells will be blocked out of their reach. It would also seem to block them out of the iconic high level modules, like Tomb of Horrors. I should look at the pre-generated characters for those modules and see if there are any demi-humans on the roster in those adventures.

I also took a fresh look at the monk class. Now, I’ve never been a fan of the monk class; it doesn’t seem to fit with the implied settings of AD&D and I strongly suspect someone was watching too much of David Carradine in Kung Fu when they decided to include it in the Players Handbook. However I’ve been watching a lot of Shaw Brothers movies recently and figured I’d give it a look. What I found is that the class looks much more playable than what I remembered from when I was a kid. While monks have lower hit points than other classes their wide variety of powers and abilities does help make up for it and their innate armor class and hand-to-hand attacks are not insignificant. Add in a few magic items and a 1st edition monk should be able to hold his or her own with the other core classes. It left me wondering why I thought the monk class was so under-powered back when I was playing AD&D regularly and I think it’s largely because we played in a “high magic” world, where characters had a lot of magic items and in that setting the advantages of a monk are blunted while their weaknesses are accentuated.

Heh. “high magic”. Okay, I’ll be honest; back in our early gaming days we were completely Monty Haul. We even joked about it, saying that people needed to make a saving throw vs blindness if anyone cast Detect Magic on the party. Occasionally we’d decide to take it down a notch and run games where even the humble +1 sword was a weapon to be treasured, but sooner or later power levels would creep back up. When I started playing again as an undergrad my group used a more measured amount of magic, but by then the image of the monk as underpowered was set in our minds. Besides, if we wanted to do a martial artist we had our copies of Oriental Adventures to draw on.

None of my players decided to take the monk out for a spin for Ravenloft, but it’s given me the desire to get one out in the field and see what they can do in actual play.

Since I started playing D&D again with the OSR movement I’ve been playing retro-clones of Basic. This was my first re-visitation of AD&D and it was a lot of fun, both to generate the characters and to run the game. I’ll be starting up a new campaign soon and for that I’m going back to a basic game using Labyrinth Lord with some imported rules from Lamentations of the Flame Princess, but I can definitely see myself running or playing another AD&D or OSRIC game in the future.

And now that I think of it, porting the monk class into a basic game would be a snap. Heck, Labyrinth Lord’s Advanced Edition Companion includes a monk class…

Hmmm….

shaw-bros-logo-titlecard

 
2 Comments

Posted by on November 5, 2015 in Fantasy, Game Design and Mechanics, Gaming

 

Tags: , , , ,